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The Art of Bundling Up

PARIS — With temperatures in the city below or near freezing last week, the scenes outside the men’s wear shows, which finished on Sunday, offered lessons in the art of dressing warmly.

Balaclavas covered lots of heads, and many bodies were draped in long overcoats. The most exciting coats offered glimpses of their wearers’ personality through patches, patterns or prints, like the brown, blue and red checks covering a certain Comme des Garçons overcoat spotted more than once. And pink, which was in abundance on the streets in Milan, reappeared in Paris, though in softer, less saturated tones that suggested it could be as versatile as navy, beige or any other neutral.

With these two, it was all about how the multicolor quilt-like print of the jacket, left, and the light and dark shades of the plaid skirt clashed (in a good way).

Fashionable, but also functional: You don’t need gloves when your sleeves are longer than your arms.
One way to prevent overheating in a balaclava? Wearing your coat as a cape.
Walking out of the Hermès show, the stylist Law Roach shot a sly look through rose-colored glasses.
The red stripe on the back of her sweater was hard to ignore, as was the craftsmanship of her structured handbag.
A pleasing palette of muted blues, greens and other pastels outside the Paul Smith show.
Between her trippy paisley top and bright yellow pants, and his pink ombré sweater and patchwork jeans, it’s hard to pick a favorite garment.
A lot of coordinating colors in this portrait, my favorite from the week. The young girl’s pink jacket and skirt, but also the woman’s red coat and shoes. Perhaps best of all: How the girl’s boots picked up the yellow outfit of the guy standing to their right.
Usher, looking monastic in Louis Vuitton, outside the Louvre.
The actor Kit Harrington, left, and the actress Rose Leslie made a smart pair in his-and-hers tailoring at the Louis Vuitton show.
These fashionistas seemed to know that with any outfit, attitude can be the best accessory.
After a few encounters with the actor Toheeb Jimoh, a star of “Ted Lasso,” you start to notice how he brightens up any room (or courtyard).
A balaclava with the color and texture of cotton candy.
It was as if he had just stepped out of a Rococo painting.
But who is she?
The rapper Kodak Black taking in the scene at Louis Vuitton.
Filming a video? Taking a selfie? Whatever it was, hopefully it documented how good his faded varsity jacket and jeans looked against the stone buildings as the sun set.
Spectators trying to get a better look as guests arrived at Dior Homme.
It’s kind of hard to see, but his red bucket hat had smiling blue elephants all over it.
Solids or stripes: Which would you choose?
The feathered Louis Vuitton jacket commanded attention, but there were subtler details — the necklace layered over the collar, the zigzag hem of the shirt, the skateboard — that were just as interesting.
Their cool stares communicated a confidence that tied their looks together.
The warm smile she flashed while heading to Givenchy was a reminder that fashion should be fun!
Tyra Banks giving a million-dollar smize as she entered Louis Vuitton.
Looking like a snack. (To be clear: I’m referring to the Puppets and Puppets cookie bag.)
With the right styling, even a drawstring plastic bag can cosplay as high fashion.
A colorful checker-print blazer, left, and overcoat, both by Comme des Garçons, looked even better up close.
The most exciting coats I saw offered glimpses of their wearers’ personality through patches, patterns or prints.
When a look is this good, you do whatever it takes to get the shot — even if it means being a back-seat photographer.
Wrapped around her head, the scarf looked that much cooler.
The way he layered the longer coat beneath the fuzzy Moncler jacket was impressive.
Fewer things are more striking than a gorgeous head of hair.
Capturing a moment of a moment being captured.
After seeing so many hats in unusual fabrics and colors, it was refreshing to spot this more traditional style outside the Walter Van Beirendonck show.
The baggy jeans were a fresh twist on typical Western style.
When I ran into Quyen Mike, a photographer whose work I’ve long followed, I had to ask him to pose for a portrait. Though he was on his way to the Rick Owens show, he not only stopped, but he also indulged me in a quick shoot at the top of these stairs.

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